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Thread: CB Radio for PC

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    Default CB Radio for PC

    As title suggests, looking for a Proggie that turns your PC into a CB Radio, Have seen in the past but forgot the title. Any links appreciated, or programs, FREE or Paid for ones I dont mind..


    Thanks heaps in advance Streeter



Look Here ->
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    CBs and computers have just about nothing in common.
    The only options you will have are:
    1) Amateur radio "hams" use something called Echolink where they can use their computer & microphone connected to the internet as a 'portal' to a radio connected on the internet. Now that is highly specific to amateur radio - not for CB. You'd have to find a CB equivalent where someone has connected their CB to the internet in a similar way.
    2) there are a few CBs 'streaming' on to the internet - you can hear them only, not use your computer to transmit as well
    3) there are ham radios that you can connect to your PC and use the PC as the user interface to run the ham radio. Some of them are dedicated boxes, all they have is the antenna connector and a computer USB connection (Ten-Tec rings a bell?) and you have to use the computer to control these 'radio in a box' packages. It may be possible to modify them to operate on 27 MHz CB frequencies?
    4) develop your own PC to CB interface and software.

    If you find what it is you're looking for, share it with the rest of us, sounds interesting.

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    Member badass's Avatar
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    Many years ago when I had repeater 1 in Adelaide I use to put it on the net via Yahoo. I used voice chat room and I made a vox hook up to do so. I donít own that repeater any more only commercial oneís. I tried to get people interested in each state in doing the same but at that time not a lot of response, It is quite easy to do so if interested I could dig out my old records.

    Cheers Badass

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    Premium Member mickc's Avatar
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    winradio maybe what you are after


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    here are the prices....


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    There was a PC based HF Transceiver on the market many years ago. Started with K......??

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    Yes this was definatly PC Based. Thanks for all the replies guys, Still searching.. Will post any results found.

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    Kachina

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    Senior Member Studio1's Avatar
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    I have been using a program called eQSO which is linked to a number of 477MHz PRS repeaters here in NZ and around the world. I know it's linked in Aussie as there's been a few of you on the channel at different times.

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    PMR Radio simplex links
    these links are located in Perth,WA and link to other links all over the world

    UHF CB.
    20-??
    25-wanneroo
    28-brigadoon
    29-rockingham

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    , seems to be some that can be put on a usb that use the sound card of ther pc

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    Thanx guys will check em out

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    $$$$

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    Quote Originally Posted by streeter75 View Post
    As title suggests, looking for a Proggie that turns your PC into a CB Radio, Have seen in the past but forgot the title. Any links appreciated, or programs, FREE or Paid for ones I dont mind..


    Thanks heaps in advance Streeter
    Hi Streeter, Have a look at this site
    We use our UHF Cb Radios for the LInks and it works fine.
    Cheers Russ

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    1) Amateur radio "hams" use something called Echolink where they can use their computer & microphone connected to the internet as a 'portal' to a radio connected on the internet. Now that is highly specific to amateur radio - not for CB. You'd have to find a CB equivalent where someone has connected their CB to the internet in a similar way.
    .....
    You also forgot to mention the digital modes.

    Starting with the oldest RTTY. I never found this mode exciting except when I was a kid in the 70's. Packet Radio AX.25 was the sucessor and had a huge world wide network, during the late 80's and early 90's. Most of it ran at 1200bps, but there is a range of baud rates. The network still exists, though it has mostly lost out to internet. There used to be a good UHF CB packet radio network down the east coast of NSW.

    These days there are more digital modes than you can poke a stick at. PSK31 jumps to mind. It seems like not a month goes by and a new mode or protocol is released.

    As mentioned, Radios and computers are very different creatures. Though there are components that a similar, it isn't possible to make a computer perform as a radio purley with software. There needs to be some extra or external hardware. Whether that hardware is located elsewhere and networked to your terminal, or if the hardware is connected directly to or installed in the computer. Radio cards like WinRadio are an example.
    Even software defined radios which run on a minimal of hardware require a sensible interface port.

    By far the most fun is taking an ordinary CB radio and interfacing a computer directly to it. Either to control the functions of the radio, like a complex channel switch, or more complex control, like substitution of the PLL or VFO.

    It can also be connected to the audio or IF strip. Software defined radio is somewhat easier at lower frequencies, low enough a parrallel printer port can be capable of the task or more common these days, a computer sound card is the used.
    This method can be used for complex DSP methods of simple modulation and demodulation like AM/FM/SSB/RTTY. It can also be used for more complex modulation like QPSK, COFDM or other digital, spread spectrum and frequency hopping modulations.

    There is also a lot of talk in the commercial world of VOIP and ROIP.
    Radio over IP. IRLP is basically a form of ROIP. Local radio networks are linked by IP. But it is also possible to link IP networks over radio, like packet radio has done for many years. It's when IP flows from Radio to Cable seamlessly that is the furture of networks.

    Further more, it is routing and protocols of digital streams that is where the big money is. ATM over radio. High speed data is networked and switched at low OSI layers on layer 1 RF physcial.

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    . double post

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    Default re baddass

    Quote Originally Posted by badass View Post
    Many years ago when I had repeater 1 in Adelaide I use to put it on the net via Yahoo. I used voice chat room and I made a vox hook up to do so. I donít own that repeater any more only commercial oneís. I tried to get people interested in each state in doing the same but at that time not a lot of response, It is quite easy to do so if interested I could dig out my old records.

    Cheers Badass
    such a nice repeater it was too.
    every time some one spoke over you bredon you had a cry and turned it off
    so hated by the locals that you had to move out in to a bus
    hows garden island going for u

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    Receive And Transmit

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    Talking LOL your wrong!!!




    So, you're interested in the idea of using your computer to control your CB, huh?

    Well, you've come to the right place. I have developed a very simple and easy-to-use system that will allow you to interface almost any 40-channel CB to your Windows 95-compatible computer. Any CB that has PLL expansion capabilities can be taken advantage of with this system.

    Here is the original project write-up: (this project was originally conceived prior to 1998 as a DOS-based computer interface, but not documented online. The following constitutes the first on-line documentation for this project.)

    Here are the basic ideas behind the system. The average 40-channel CB (and many export models) uses a fairly simple Phase-Locked-Loop (PLL) system to tune in the various channels. The PLL chip iteself uses a set of digital programming lines to determine which frequency the system is to generate. These lines are normally controlled by the channel selector and/or band switch. They could just as easily be controlled by a set of toggle switches, or a set of digital output lines from a device such as a computer. Thats where the fun can begin. By using the simple interface I have designed, you can use the printer port of any IBM-compatible computer (running Windows 95 or higher) to control the programming lines of the PLL chip. This allows any radio with an expandable PLL (such as a Cobra 148 gtl, or a Uniden Grant) to be taken advantage of. The interface can control up to 8 programming lines, or 255 seperate frequencies. With the additon of a monitoring line using the input lines of the printer port, we can monitor the transmit pin of the CB mic jack, and have the computer change to a different channel when the radio is keyed. This gives the CB split-frequency operation. Those of you familiar with the RCI 2950/70 radios know what a nice thing that can be from time to time. By using this system, ANY compatible CB radio can have that ability!

    As of January 2003, I am once again working on this project. The old file system has been changed to include the radio name, and the old DOS software has been discarded in favor of Windows-95 compatible software, currently under development. The features are a basic 40-channel controller with split-transmit ability, and an expanded-frequency controller with split-transmit ability. I will post the demos on this page as I complete them. I will post screen shots from time to time, as well.

    June 21, 2004: Due to requests to purchase the schematics/software, I am posting the schematic, and making the software available for $20.00. Once the software is purchased, you will have unlimited access to any data files that are written. The purchased package will come with data files for MB8719 PLL circuits (Cobra 148 GTL, etc), am-only PLL02A (older Midland/GE radios among others) circuits, and basic TC9102 PLL (Uniden PC66, Cobra 25LTD, etc) circuits. The data files can be writtin by hand with any common text editor (I use Notepad in Windows), as long as the data structure is understood, and the data order is followed. I plan on developing a datafile utility when time permits.

    February 24, 2006: Finally got around to rewriting the software to get rid of some major bugs, and simplify the interface. So far, its working very nicely. The data file utility is a long ways off, though. I also worked out a couple more data files, but need to work on others.

    Here is a screen-shot of the latest version of the software:

    April 24, 2006: All bugs seem to be gone, all help files are written, and the PLL data file utility is done. I've completed an installation CD, which includes the application files, along with schematics for both versions of the electronics for the interface. From time o time, I will be listing the system CD (with all of its included diagrams and utility programs), on Ebay. Listings will come and go, so if you do NOT see a listing for this software from us, just email for details on how to obtain your copy directly. We DO accept Paypal.

    Here is what the CD will look like:

    July 21, 2008: I was just made aware of some bootleg copies of this software being sold on Ebay by someone out of the UK. Be aware that these are NOT legitimate copies, and will NOT be supported in any way! I have not entered into any agreement with any entity for distribution of this copywrited software.

    Purchasing bootleg copies (of any copywrited material) violates both US and international copywrite laws, can result in very stiff fines as well as jail time. Civil suits for compensation may also be filed by the owners of copywrited material.


    I have personally used this system with a Uniden PC 66, Uniden PC68, Cobra 148GTL, GE 5813B, Uniden Grant XL, Cobra 21XLR, and a Galaxy DX959. It can be adapted to many, many more radios, as well!



    Here are a couple images of the prototype interface. The newer designs are simpler, and use fewer parts.

    Inside view of the prototype interface unit.

    Another inside view showing more detail

    Rear view showing connectors. Uses standard DB-25 and D-sub 15 connectors

    Additional wiring info for Ebay version of the system:

    Schematic note: Some resistor values may not be shown. Assume all non-labeled resistor values to be 2.2k ohms.

    Basic connection of the interface to the CB is fairly simple. Isolate the CB's PLL chip data pins from the rest of the circuit board and connect them to the interface as shown on the schematic, making sure to observe the location of the least significant and most significant data pins (data bits). A max of 8 data pins may be used. If more than 8 pins are used on your chip, you will be limited to the least significant 8 data pins. If you do have more than 8, make sure that the rest are isolated from the circuit board and tied to logic low. If your PLL chip uses less than 8, simply leave the unused interface data lines disconnected

    The transmit control output on the interface hardware is simply connected to the transmit pin of the mic jack on the radio. For radios that need to have the mic present on receive, you may need to wire a relay between the interface and the radio, using the interface TX output to engage the relay coil in TX mode. The relay contacts would then be wired so that in RX mode, the RX pin of the mic is grounded, and in TX mode, the TX pin is grounded. The relay coil would have one end tied to 13 volts, and the other end tied to the TX output of the interface.

    Here is a rough diagram of the relay wiring:








    Quote Originally Posted by mitaux8030 View Post
    CBs and computers have just about nothing in common.
    The only options you will have are:
    1) Amateur radio "hams" use something called Echolink where they can use their computer & microphone connected to the internet as a 'portal' to a radio connected on the internet. Now that is highly specific to amateur radio - not for CB. You'd have to find a CB equivalent where someone has connected their CB to the internet in a similar way.
    2) there are a few CBs 'streaming' on to the internet - you can hear them only, not use your computer to transmit as well
    3) there are ham radios that you can connect to your PC and use the PC as the user interface to run the ham radio. Some of them are dedicated boxes, all they have is the antenna connector and a computer USB connection (Ten-Tec rings a bell?) and you have to use the computer to control these 'radio in a box' packages. It may be possible to modify them to operate on 27 MHz CB frequencies?
    4) develop your own PC to CB interface and software.

    If you find what it is you're looking for, share it with the rest of us, sounds interesting.

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