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Thread: Cloud Storage and Photos - Options and reviews

  1. #21
    LSemmens
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    I, too, tend to be leery of online storage for some of the reasons listed above. The big players i.e. Google, M$, et.al. would not be an issue, it's the new kids on the block that you need be wary of. E.g. Some unscrupulous individuals can, and probably have, set up mirror sites to harvest such data, an example from my early days on the 'net I thought I'd check out what was on TV interstate (at the time the 10 network was not being broadcast to Darwin) So I typed in ten.com, thinking I'd get channel ten tv info, nope! It was a porn site. Only 'cause, in my ignorance, I was unaware of the difference that adding .au would make. It still happens, usually with financial sites, but there is no reason it cannot happen anywhere else. Obviously, if you are aware of the risks, and do maintain a good security regime, it is no less reliable than a good backup policy. FWIW, I take a risk with most of my program data in that if I lose it, it will be a nuisance, but nothing more. My critical stuff, I have a local backup and a copies stored off site (interstate, what's more).
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...



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    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post

    \
    <cough><bullshit>

    You would make a good village witch doctor
    Hilarious, first you do all you can to insult me, knowing you have the control to abuse and do what you want, which is typical of bullies. Then turn round and say you backup on your cloud data on you pc.

    Just can't stop laughing, why pay to store your data with someone else who can use it at their whim, when you also store it at home. Unlike most I read the terms of use for all things I use, that's the reason I don't use proprietary last century crap or get sucked in to increase corporate profits by giving them your data.

    As for a good phone camera, who cares, not into wasting heaps of money and still not be able to take the macro and telephoto shots I want. It's pretty simple to carry a 1T drive in your pocket for backup and downloading shots, no cost, total security and access anywhere you want anytime any place.
    Last edited by spook; 16-12-15 at 02:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spook View Post
    Hilarious, first you do all you can to insult me, knowing you have the control to abuse and do what you want, which is typical of bullies. Then turn round and say you backup on your cloud data on you pc.

    Just can't stop laughing, why pay to store your data with someone else who can use it at their whim, when you also store it at home. Unlike most I read the terms of use for all things I use, that's the reason I don't use proprietary last century crap or get sucked in to increase corporate profits by giving them your data.

    As for a good phone camera, who cares, not into wasting heaps of money and still not be able to take the macro and telephoto shots I want. It's pretty simple to carry a 1T drive in your pocket for backup and downloading shots, no cost, total security and access anywhere you want anytime any place.
    I insult you because you are an imbecile.

    When people like myself go to the bother of spending hours posting up quality posts giving a proper review of products, we get very easily sick of the the type of user that reminds me of the monkey at the zoo that sits up a tree and throws shit at passers by.

    My advice to you is dont bother participating in threads where your main objective is to poo poo the topic. That way, you wont get upset when I call you an imbecile and I wont have to bother removing you from the topic because you are not providing anything worthwhile to it. So please, dont bother to comment again. I can put up with your conspiracy theories in most General Chat topics, but I wont be wearing them in technology posts.

  • #24
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    Ok, this leads me to my 4th and last service.

    Microsoft OneDrive



    The app itself is very much similar to the other offerings and realistically, it offers pretty the same as they do. Like the others, it is offered by a major technology company that owns data centres all over the world. Microsoft offer OneDrive deals on a lot of new mobile phone products, particuarly through Samsung.




    Ok, I realise thats not much of a review for Microsoft, but there isnt really much to add. But lets cut to the chase , who is best and who isnt ?

    Any of these 4 companies (Dropbox, Amazon, Microsoft and Google) are pretty safe options for storing your photos. All own numerous major data centres and mirror your account contents on to multiple servers, so that if something happened to the server housing your account, there are numerous other copies. Realistically, the only way you could lose your content would be for the earth to end <enter conspiracy theorist>.

    Pricing - Its hard to beat Amazon here, or Google if you dont mind compression to avoid paying.

    Dropbox - Basic Account 2GB Free (there are also lots of referral credits) - 25 GB $3.99AUD a month or $39.99AUD a year , Pro $12.99AUD a month or $129AUD a year for a 1TB.
    Amazon - $11.99USD a year Unlimited (photos only), Unlimited Everything $59.99USD a year.
    Google Drive/Photos - 15GB free, Photos stored with compression free, additional space 100GB to 30TB from $1.99 to $299.99 a month.
    Microsoft OneDrive - 15GB Free, Camera Roll bonus 15GB, 50GB $2AUD a month, 1TB with Office 365

    When it came to speed, Dropbox was several times faster than the others. They claim this, I expected it to be a marketing ploy, but its true. I would put Google second and Microsoft and Amazon to battle out the minor placings.

    So all up, what do I recommend ?

    If you are a Gmail user, its hard to go past Google. your allowance is split between Gmail, Drive and Photos. If you allow compression on your photos, they are stored for free. Compression is on around 16MP and above and you cannot see any difference by eye.

    If you are a Microsoft user and have Hotmail etc, then Onedrive is probably a good option.

    Hard up for money ? Amazon photos kicks arse for value.

    But for me, Dropbox. The superior speeds up and down make life easier, though if I was on the NBN with better speeds at home, I might look at other options.

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    lsemmens (19-04-16),Tiny (19-04-16),tristen (24-01-16)

  • #25
    Crazy Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post
    Something I should probably have mentioned earlier in regards to backing up data.

    When you have a cloud account and also have the program installed on your PC, you also have a local copy of your photos on your computer. So you have 2 copies - one in your online account and a local copy on your computer.

    I should probably have cleared that up in regards to the "if the internet crashes you lose all your data". Though I am pretty sure places like Microsoft, Google, Amazon and Dropbox do actually mirror your data at multiple data centers
    Admin; Thanks for this informative thread, just got the following article from Malwarebites that clears a few things up & adds a little light on security for Cloud users.



    Should you store your data in the cloud?

    April 15, 2016 | BY



    It’s pretty simple to understand where a file goes when you save it on your PC. It lives on your hard drive, possibly housed in a set of folders you’ve created and organized yourself. That file is only stored on your computer, unless you decide to email it to yourself or save it on an external hard drive or USB.
    Now what about the cloud?
    At its most basic level, “the cloud” is just fancy-talk for a network of connected servers (a server is simply a computer that provides data or services to other computers). When you save files to the cloud, they can be accessed from a computer connected to that cloud’s network. Now take that idea and multiply it to understand how the cloud works for you. The cloud is not just a few servers, but a network of many servers typically stored in a spaceship-sized warehouse—or several hundred spaceship-sized warehouses. These warehouses are guarded and managed by companies such as Google (Google Docs), Apple (iCloud), or Dropbox.
    So it’s not just some nebulous concept. It’s physical, tangible, real.

    When you save files to the cloud, you can access them on any computer, provided it’s connected to the Internet and you’re signed into your cloud services platform. Take Google Drive. If you use Gmail, you can access Drive anywhere you can access your email. Sign in for one service and find your entire library of documents and photos on another.
    Why are people concerned with cloud security?
    It’s physically out of your hands. You aren’t saving to a hard drive at your house. You are sending your data to another company, which could be saving your data thousands of miles away, so keeping that information safe is now dependent on them. “Whether data is being sent automatically (think apps that sync to the cloud) or driven by users uploading photos to social media, the end result is that it’s all there somewhere being logged and stored,” says Jérôme Segura, Senior Security Researcher at Malwarebytes.
    And that somewhere is a place that’s not in your direct control.
    Risks of cloud storage
    Cloud security is tight, but it’s not infallible. Cybercriminals can get into those files, whether by guessing security questions or bypassing passwords. That’s what happened in The Great iCloud Hack of 2014, where nude pictures of celebrities were accessed and published online.
    But the bigger risk with cloud storage is privacy. Even if data isn’t stolen or published, it can still be viewed. Governments can legally request information stored in the cloud, and it’s up to the cloud services provider to deny access. Tens of thousands of requests for user data are sent to Google, Microsoft, and other businesses each year by government agencies. A large percentage of the time, these companies hand over at least some kind of data, even if it’s not the content in full.
    “Some people argue that they have nothing to hide, that they’re not doing anything wrong, and couldn’t care less if their private information is accessed, especially if it helps in the effort to track down terrorists,” says Segura. “While there is no doubt that ready access to data is an invaluable asset for intelligence agencies, it is really important to remember that each individual has a fundamental right to privacy.”
    Benefits of cloud storage
    On the flip side, the data you save to the cloud is far more secure than it is on your own hard drive. Cloud servers are housed in warehouses offsite and away from most employees, and they are heavily guarded. In addition, the data in those servers is encrypted, which makes hacking it a laborious, if not formidable, task for criminals. Whereas a malware infection on your home computer could expose all of your personal data to cybercrooks, and even leave your files vulnerable to . In fact, we recommend backing up your files to a cloud service as a hedge against ransomware.
    Another benefit to storing data on the cloud is cost effectiveness and ease-of-access. You can store tons of data, often for free, using the cloud. Measure that against the number of external hard drives and USBs you’d have to purchase, and the difficulty accessing data once you’ve stored to multiple other devices, and you can see why cloud storage has become a popular option for businesses and consumers alike.
    Final verdict
    Yes, your data is relatively safe in the cloud—likely much more so than on your own hard drive. In addition, files are easy to access and maintain. However, cloud services ultimately put your data in the hands of other people. If you’re not particularly concerned about privacy, then no big whoop. But if you have sensitive data you’d like keep from prying eyes…probably best to store in a hard drive that remains disconnected from your home computer.
    If you’re ready to store data on the cloud, we suggest you use a cloud service with multi-factor authentication and encryption. In addition, follow these best practices to help keep your data on the cloud secure:

    • Use hardcore passwords: Long and randomized passwords should be used for data stored on the cloud. Don’t use the same password twice.
    • Back up files in different cloud accounts: Don’t put all your important data in one place.
    • Practice smart browsing: If you’re accessing the cloud on a public computer, remember to log out and never save password info.


    source:
    Cheers, Tiny
    "You can lead a person to knowledge, but you can't make them think? If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.
    The information is out there; you just have to let it in."

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    LSemmens
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    Thanks, Tiny, that seems to be a pretty fair analysis of the pros and cons of cloud storage.
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...

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    Enabling two-step verification is a good thing to do also

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    Its no different to anything else you do on the internet. If you have a password of abc123, you get hacked. And of course its the same as anything else.

    I dont know why people freak about cloud storage, when its just as secure as anything else. How secure depends on you.

    The only cloud service I know of thats hacked is Apple's Icloud.

    Some may find this interesting that I just posted :

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    A year or 2 on, how is the take up ?

    I have files (90% photos) on just about all of the them these days......backups of backups so to speak.

    Google Photos is the main one I use, mainly for its ease but also because of facial recognition. Once turned on in the menu, its tries to group photos of the one person by recognising their face. You can then allocate the person a name. That way, if you are looking for a particular photo of someone, its very easy to find. I also use Gmail and Google Drive which all comes under the 1gb allowance.

    As I have been upgrading my phone every 2 years ( I am happy to spend the money on keeping an updated smart phone with the best camera over spending money on a camera), I keep getting free offers through Samsung for Onedrive. I figured it was a waste to not use it, so I also have the same files on there. Their plans are a bit of a mishmash.......but if I keep getting free use through promos I will keep using it.

    I was previously using Dropbox, but they have started to take a real business approach rather than personal. They are still by far the fastest in my opinion, but are at the pricey end so I decided to stop my subscription. Whats in the account stays in the account, I just cant add anything further.

    Because it is so cheap, I also subscribed to Amazon Prime Photos. Their offer has changed a bit, I got 105 gig for $11.99 a year. Their servers are a little slow at loading photos though (possibly US ?)

    So yeah, realistically I am a bit of a Cloud Junkie I will have the NBN shortly and have a heap of photos I want to scan and upload, so a faster upload speed will be good.

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    Google Drive/gmail/Docs for everything on the unlimited uploads photo size. It is just so easy to grab another device and have it all there.

    Since using Google Docs for work, I have come to like sheets and Drive quite a bit. No more multiple copies of a document doing the rounds, update a sheet as it is being viewed in a meeting, etc.

    I still have 25 Gb Of free dropbox that I sometimes use.

  • #31
    LSemmens
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    Personally, All my photos are accessible without the need for an internet connection.
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lsemmens View Post
    Personally, All my photos are accessible without the need for an internet connection.
    You must then either carry around a computer with you or a collection of photo albums .Or have a very small photo collection on a smart phone or a very large smart phone memory. Or don't take them away from home


    This is the point of cloud storage and technology. Its available anywhere or anytime. I can pull up a photo of any past event with friends while out, invoices - anything I put in there.


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