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Thread: DHCP range and static IP's

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    Default DHCP range and static IP's

    I'm wondering what the most correct setup would be for the following:

    I have a router set up with DHCP for IP addresses. Some IP's are reserved for convenience (eg printer, TV, etc).

    I also have several AP's and a NAS, which have static IP's to allow admin or remote access. These IP addresses are also currently reserved to ensure that don't get incorrectly allocated.

    Below is an example:
    - Router: 192.198.1.1
    - AP A: 192.168.1.2
    - AP B: 192.168.1.3
    - NAS: 192.168.1.9

    The current DHCP range is 192.168.1.2 to 100, which includes the range of the AP's and NAS with static IP's.

    As the AP's and NAS have static IP's set, should I continue to set the IP address range as above, or should I change the range to (eg) 192.168.1.10 to 100, which excludes the static addresses?



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    Ok - can disregard. Spoke with a colleague who explained it to me, which now means I can Google the right keywords

    Essentially, devices with static IP's do not need to be included in a DHCP range. Or put another way, the DHCP range does not exclude other IP's that are assigned by other methods. That is what I was looking to confirm.

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    I prefer to leave my equipment dhcp configured and for those that need it, reserve an address within the dhcp pool using their MAC address.

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    I prefer the other extreme, my entire network is static addressed except for a small range of DHCP allocated addresses on the WiFi side for "guest" access.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo123 View Post
    I prefer to leave my equipment dhcp configured and for those that need it, reserve an address within the dhcp pool using their MAC address.
    Which is the way I initially had this network setup. It made it easier being able to reserve IPís from one central point. However for one reason or another I was getting the occasional IP conflict with reserved IPís for the APís. Iím hoping by removing those IPís from the DHCP pool the issues will stop.

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    It is better to remove static IP pool from DHCP pool for 1 simple reason - you cannot guarantee your static IP device will be switched on before DHCP device will.
    If DHCP device start first your router can allocate IP address which you used as a static IP address with device which currently off. You will get IP conflict in this scenario unless your router is smart enough to remember the static IP used even if the device is off.

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    you can also give a pool for your DHCP , denn it would work without conflict

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    Quote Originally Posted by fromaron View Post
    It is better to remove static IP pool from DHCP pool for 1 simple reason - you cannot guarantee your static IP device will be switched on before DHCP device will.
    If DHCP device start first your router can allocate IP address which you used as a static IP address with device which currently off. You will get IP conflict in this scenario unless your router is smart enough to remember the static IP used even if the device is off.
    Yep, I agree with this scenario. I reserve the bottom 20 for static IPs, and DHCP pool allocated above that. Works perfectly for me.

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