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Thread: I love linux

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    LSemmens
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    Default I love linux

    I just had to say that! The following is my reason!

    I started having intermittent problems with the keyboard on my main lappy. the <ctrl> key would intermittently stop working followed by the <shift> key, what had me wondering if it were a software fault was the fact that the RHS ones stopped working too. Plugging in an external keyboard did resolve the issue, but that was impractical as the keyboard would slide around on my laptop. I just pulled the hard drive out of that lappy and plugged it into a spare laptop (as you do) and it booted right up. I challenge any broken windows or bit of fruit user to do that and succeed. So all I have lost is about twenty minutes of finding spare lappy a screwdriver an working out how to remove the drives.
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...

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    Well...really, 'linux' is just a kernel, and the sort of hardware migration ease you reflect kindly upon above, is due to those ppl who put whatever linux distribution you use together ~ the magic as it were, is not entirely within the linux kernel. The other thing here wrt hardware migration, is equally so for other OS types that don't use an OS system registry to knit everything together...

    ...MacOS tends to be a little non-sequitur here, because they have a specific, targeted hardware set. and personal data etc is treated ex-pate to the OS layer...so it's a different kettle of fish in a *BSD sort of way.

    Some (hardened) linux distros complain bitterly about hardware swaps, and invariably root user has to address things. Not all linux distros are the same...ie; installing Debian on a recent laptop is going to be a slight pita compared to installing Linux Mint on the same hardware, and it's not linux you need thank for that, but the curators of that distribution ; credit where it's due B)

    Linux kernel drivers have come a long way too, but then so has the rest of the world (technology)..with the possible exception of snd-intel-HDA wherein each manufacturer using the hardware implements it in yet another way to avoid copyright conflicts, and there is no way to know or probe what they've done, and of course there's still a lot of hardware being made that relies on manufacturer provided drivers for mac/win that don't work with linux ; a lot of the time here as well, this is to protect device/firmware IP, not so much as it is targeting win/mac (a lot of device manufactures use the same chips implemented in different ways)...their own little copyright dance again...

    Where linux has been 'bad'...or moreover, when it's open source nature has been exploited... is to consider AndroidOS in it's many and various guises, and what primarily CN based manufactures did with that...for example, when you hear of certain company's hardware being blacklisted because it's unsafe and/or has so called 'back doors', dollars to donuts that device is running a hacked linux kernel (or a microkernel hidden inchip) -- they would never have seen this coming, when linux was let out into the wild ; a lot of fiscal/social damage has been done (ongoing), on the back of dodgy devices running a linux based kernel OS..like Android.

    That open source nature of the linux kernel (coupled with similar GPL/FOSS open softwares that comprise a linux distro/system), means you don't really need to be reliant on linux distributors to get what you need...and at the time being disgruntled with -all- linux distros, my new millenia resolution was to do the Linux from Scratch book. You can sortta do the same thing with AndroidOS caveat the device manufacturer releasing driver code/firmware. I can safely say, if you've never compiled your own linux system to specifically suit your needs, you are missing out -- it's like the difference between a stock engine, and the same engine having been blueprinted&balanced and tuned to racing spec. Plus you built it yourself...it's unusually rewarding...by the time 2010 came around a decade later, I considered debian had 'come of age' and stuck with that. but I know I could always 'roll my own' linux system, and that's the one thing you can't do with proprietary OS' ~ they keep their recipes secret..like CocaCola, KFC..preparation H ... =^)

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    Linux-Unix-osX, all related.
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    Statistically, if you wait long enough, everything will happen!

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    LSemmens
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    Yes, wotnot, you are correct. I do run a pre-compiled version of Linux (Mint - Cinnamon desktop) For me it just works, and, I haven't seen the need to "balance and blueprint" it. The fact that it is so portable is a winner in my book. Had I needed to transfer all my system configs and work to the new machine the usual way (i.e. file transfer) I'd be stuffing around for days just trying to work out what I missed.
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...

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    Quote Originally Posted by porkop View Post
    Linux-Unix-osX, all related.
    Related yes, but not the same...ie; macos is quicker than windows (via bootcamp) on an iMac, and linux on the same hardware (via rEFIt) is quicker than both those OS' on the Apple hardware....


    Quote Originally Posted by lsemmens View Post
    Yes, wotnot, you are correct. I do run a pre-compiled version of Linux (Mint - Cinnamon desktop) For me it just works, and, I haven't seen the need to "balance and blueprint" it. The fact that it is so portable is a winner in my book. Had I needed to transfer all my system configs and work to the new machine the usual way (i.e. file transfer) I'd be stuffing around for days just trying to work out what I missed.
    I was displeased when the zippy the pinhead quotes were forced out of emacs, and similarly when the karens and the woke sanitized the kernel....



    ..from linux-2.0.15 ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by porkop View Post
    Linux-Unix-osX, all related.
    You might as well add Android to your list too... it's also related, vaguely..

    But yes, I've been using Linux Mint in various forms for about the last 12 or more years. I usually load it onto an older laptop, when I get a new laptop for windows, which I need unfortunately. But for 90% of my usage, it's the Linux laptop that gets the flogging..

    I just realised the other day that I hadn't turned my windows 10 laptop on for over a month, when the update prompts started bleeping at me..

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    In the past I have even achieved such swaps with Windows XP. It depends on the hardware. I did it most often with an Asus eee 1000H, with minimal driver additions for better performance.
    Even Hackintosh (which is a Mac image, that usually needs a lot of work) worked out of the box on this little lappy back then.

    Never tried this with later versions of Windows, UEFI (secure) boot and such nightmares of today are likely prohibitive

    ...and yes I still love Linux (KDE versions, not fond of Mint), despite a recent affair with Windows 11
    I am an arrogant, irritating RSole.

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    How many here were running linux in the 90's?.....anyone?

    This was back in the linux 1.x.x kernel days, when installing a linux system was considered to be 'user hostile'...and beyond the scope of the 'average end user'....went something like this...

    1. Install base system [joe public immediately gets confronted with multi-partition disc setup..ie; /, /boot, /usr, /var and /home ...not to mention /usr/local or /opt which often were separate partitions]....imagining the end user succeeded here...

    2. Compile your own kernel to suit your hardware setup [joe public is thrown head first into the deep end of the GNU C compiler, and something called 'make config'...before the make menuconfig ncurses wrapper existed...]....imagining the end user succeeded here (many didn't)...

    3. Install (or compile and install) packages [joe public is confronted with the situation that the actual software they want to run, isn't available as a pre-compiled binary package, and so one would need to download a tarball of the software code from somewhere like the sunsite repository, and become conversant with compiling one's own binaries, and the brain becomes embossed with the mantra './configure , make , make install' ..forever... =] One would often end up having to do this anyway, because the binary package available was either old or didn't work...

    Linux systems are a -lot- easier to deal with today, and joe public can typically install a distro and run it, without having to go through the 'hard yards' above ; it easier, yes, but I fear a lot of folks don't learn as much in the process ~ the only analogy I can think of that kinda fits, is as child I was taught how to build my own paper kite : now you just buy them from a toy shop 8)


    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Fester View Post
    In the past I have even achieved such swaps with Windows XP. It depends on the hardware.
    Yeah, it was always doable, just a pita...having to boot into safe mode, uninstall any hardware driver package you can find, know you couldn't trust the uninstall script to do that properly, so have to bust out regedit and manually check to be sure, and then reboot the machine more than a dozen times to allow it to detect new hardware and request drivers...and yet another reboot....lol....it was easier/quicker just to install a fresh windows instance on the new hardware, and migrate user data =)

    The going will be harder these days, what with TPM and device signing etc etc

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    I played with Linux way back then, but did not take it seriously because all of my work was based around DOS/WINDOWS. It was not until a few years ago when I decided to bite the bullet and convert my last two hold outs to Linux that I could leave windows behind. Even now, I still have one windows machine because of iTunes. My other hold outs were a database that I had developed using M$ Access (dating back to 2000) and my music documents which were designed in Word using highly customised styles and VBA. Even now, my music, although now adapted to Writer is not what it used to be. That said, I haven't put a lot of effort into "tidying" them up, either.
    I'm out of my mind, but feel free to leave a message...

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    Quote Originally Posted by wotnot View Post
    How many here were running linux in the 90's?.....anyone?
    Absolutely. I still remember going to the BOOKSTORE to buy my Red Hat disk set for 10 German Marks but I only got really interested when the K desktop environment came out late 90's.
    I only saw this experimental at that time but was curious because of what the UNIX dudes where doing with the backend of our Windows clients to interface the Alcatel telephone systems, so I wanted to 'learn' Linux.
    Things were still a bit too messy with K desktop for me, I am no programmer, just a user with very specific (mostly non office related)requirements and only Windows at that time could full fill them.
    Talking mostly about audio and video digitising using (for me) quite expensive hardware cards. Video compression was also only possible using hardware (MJPEG cards) and all the software was written in Windows to access them and pretty much the only video editor in early/mid 90's was Adobe Premier, for Audio Steinberg Cubase( originally for Atari) but the Windows PC got an order of magnitude more exciting when it was available for Windows, however nothing for Linux.

    Linux is even today only very marginally useful for DAW and Video editing. Some stuff looks good but when you try to actually do something it is a disaster, mostly (again) when it needs to interact with hardware.
    Today I only use a Mac because of the reliability with these things. Imagine when you are recording an important session and Windows 10 suddenly decides it need to reboot to finish the update or the Defender tells you with a loud bell that it's database is not up to date. It takes ages to disable all the annoying Windows popups and the minute it updates they are all back again. Windows 11 is a bit better in that respect but still not totally quiet.

    Unfortunately (Ubuntu based) Linux versions are starting to get annoying with popups too.

    Of course one should never have any puter running in the studio that is connected to the net, not even a Mac.
    I am an arrogant, irritating RSole.

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