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Thread: Major Risk to home via bad flexible water pipe hoses - My personal experience

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    Default Major Risk to home via bad flexible water pipe hoses - My personal experience

    A really weird thing happened to me last night.

    Close to midnight I was just about to turn in when I heard a strange noise from the bathroom ... a "pop" then a "sushing" sound

    Short of finding a ghost I found mains water gushing from under the vanity sink. Knowing that we had those flexible metal hose things that usually have a tap at the wall I put my hand in to find no tap to close ... Having a bad cold and flu at the time (and am still recovering) I had to run to the front of the property in the dark and fumble to close the mains water tap. ... and no I was not starkers and I did have some clothes on although they got wet pretty quickly

    I then spent the next 2 hrs cleaning up water everywhere swearing with the missus and then swearing at her (for constantly asking stupid questions and doing stupid things like trying to throw out all my personal bathroom stuff)
    I later scrumaged around my garage for old plumbing bits to stop the leaking.

    Fortunately I managed to find a replacement hose (who knows where I originally got it from) that gave me a fix.

    Now the big questions :

    Why did this happen ?
    (someone mentioned to me today about "cheap" imports) I am sure the bathroom fitout was done about 10 years ago

    Is there something else I should do now ?
    There is another hose still in place of the same age - I plan to change this anyway... probably fit taps as well. May be I should get a plumber in to do a check, assuming there is something here they can inspect or advise on

    If this had happened while we were away on holidays this could have been an absolute disaster. If I was not at home and the missus was I can imagine what the call to me over the phone would have been like ... it is had enough when they can not work out the TV remote control



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    Those hoses are called easy hookers and you would normally have taps but maybe the builder was a tight arse! It was probably one of those things that happens occasionally.

    Leroy
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    The builder was actually me !!! (owner builder) but I simply bought all the items new from supposedly reputable local suppliers

    I rang the original plumber tonight as well who has heard of this only once before (and he has been around for about twenty years)

    The plumber is gonna come over in the next few days and put taps in change the hose etc

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    I used on of those hoses on my fathers toilet line, saved me bending and flaring a chrome coated copper pipe.

    I did notice once when visiting that the way the hose sat, that it had moved or relaxed into a position, it was not as how i had installed it.

    I also noted that when someone used the washing machine which is nearby in the laundry that the hose moved, i worked out as the washing machines water solenoid was activated on and off that the water main pressure puts quite a shock type strain on the hose itself.

    It may be a reason to weaken it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post

    I also noted that when someone used the washing machine which is nearby in the laundry that the hose moved, i worked out as the washing machines water solenoid was activated on and off that the water main pressure puts quite a shock type strain on the hose itself.

    It may be a reason to weaken it....
    Washing machines and dishwashers cause a lot of 'water shock' in the pipes. Because the valves go from fully open to fully shut in a fraction of a second, all that kinetic energy has to go somewhere - and it's usually absorbed by the pipes moving/expanding.

    Those stainless braided hoses have a rubber type hose inside, and the braid keeps it from bulging out. I suppose if the braid develops a weak spot, it could allow the hose to expand in one point and potentially burst - which seems to be what happened to OP. I have not seen it happen myself, or heard of it - but that's not to say it hasn't happened.

    Isolating taps at the wall are certainly a good idea, but as OP says, if it happens when you're not home - YIKES!
    This is why I've built my place so that all areas where water is present - kitchen, bathroom, laundry etc have floors which slope to the centre of the room, and a shower-type drain is in the middle of the floor. Should a tap be left on, a pipe blow off the dishwasher or whatever, the water will run to the middle of the floor and drain away.

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    Picture of the hose please

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    I was discussing a future bathroom renpo a few weeks ago with a builder mate, and he was telling me that one of those hoses 'let go' in his own house. He had bought 2 of them from bunnings and they had been in for about 3 months. Like the OP he was lucky enough to be at home when it spewed water everywhere in his ensuite.
    His only advice was to spend a few $$ more and get a decent hose (not a chine import) - but it sounds like that's what the OP did anyway

    Cheers.
    When I was a kid, I used to have an imaginary friend. I thought he went everywhere with me. I could talk to him and he could hear me, and he could grant me wishes and stuff too. But then I grew up, and stopped going to church.

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    1: a mini stop cock should be placed at all points feeding basins - toilet etc.

    2: the hose moving when solenoid kicks in is called "water hammer" and this is eliminated by
    installing a hammer arrestor near the point that is causing it.Water hammer can even
    crack joints in old soft soldered pipe work.The arrestor is a valve that has a diaphragm in it and
    and when the solenoid shuts causing the water to bounce back it forces onto the diaphragm
    which then flex's back up into the chamber above it filled with air.

    3: when using braided hose you should always measure and get the next size up so there
    is no tension on the connection or the crimp.

    4: people say dont get Chinese imports well im afraid 99% are and the best way is to actually use annealed
    chrome tube with kinko nuts and olive's and they should be the nylon olives and not the brass ones.

    When i was plumbing and even to this day i will not install the braid lines except for the ones that are
    part of a flick mixer set.I always used annealed chrome and although it takes a little longer to do it is
    the best.There is no need to flare etc being annealed when you tighten the nut the nylon olive compresses
    and beds into the copper.

    thats my 2 cents
    Last edited by fandtm666; 15-05-12 at 03:55 PM.

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    I quoted a repair job a few months ago for a guy that had the same thing happen in his bathroom vanity. Unfortunately for him he wasn't home at the time and the water damage was quite extensive.
    The insurance assessor told him they had had a big influx of these type of accidents.
    According to him most of these hose came from Bunnings. You get what you pay for.
    Having a floor waste in any wet area is a good idea but not compulsory anymore.

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    Sorry All - just managed to check/reread this thread tonight.

    I arranged for my Plumber (my original plumber guy who has done my last 2 extensions plus other stuff) to change out the other remaining flex hose as well as put in a brand new flex for the one I temporarily put in

    He also put the mini taps at the wall ...(mind you he still said to me that the taps were not needed ... I told him to fark off and just put them in ... I was sure he was not gonna answer his phone at 1am in the morning!)

    The one flex that was remaining was not far off from being a problem as well. It seems that some of the metal braid was starting to rust plus some of the wires of the braid were starting to sit perpendicular to the hose like needles!

    The plumber took both of the bad hoses with him to show other plumbers and to keep them as a sample as a reference problem. I will call him tomorrow and see if get some pics so I can post here

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    6 years ago our house sustained 35k of damage due to a flexible hose failing while we were away, came home to a waterfall gushing downstairs with a 12" deep lake in the laundry and spare room. All the plaster came away from the ceiling and walls and all the laundry cupboards and bedroom furniture was stuffed, washing machine/ dryer /chest freezer / vacuum all knackered as well.
    Insurance company was excellent apart from halfway thru repairs found some termite damage so wouldnt replace the framework, luckily it was non-supporting so my old man and myself did the re framing with treated pine and then builders continued on with the repairs.
    It was a nightmare at the time but sort of a blessing as we wouldnt have found the termite damage otherwise untill they hit the floor joists.

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    I have 3 photos to add ...









    As can be seen maybe there was a warning considering the sate of the flex hose... but how often does one look into the pipework under a sink in a cupboard !
    Last edited by checkitout; 20-05-12 at 08:17 PM. Reason: Image load

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    Default What is likely hose life?

    We have just had a similar hose failure - wrecked the vanity but little other damage fortunately.

    Two questions: 1. How does one recognise a quality hose?

    2. What is the likely life of Bunnings hose? Sounds like a lot of work but one could just replace the hose of a regular basis.

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    I've also had it happen once with those flexible hoses, a washing machine hose and with a copper pipe that failed on join in ceiling.

    The flexible hose's I have found do move, water hammer etc. If they are touching anything, ie the other hose, they wear over time at that point. I make it a point to check them regularly and replace at first sign of damage.

    Never fun having a flooded house.

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    I'm still at a job now where one of these hoses burst in a Holiday home and caused $1000's in damages.
    Flooded the floor it was on and went through to the floor below.

    Spoke to the Plumber and he said, he'd had a few failures of these "Easy Hookers" and suggested if i had any (which i do, all 27 years old) that i replace them with hard drawn copper.
    They supply the 2 Flick mixers in my house.

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    I dont know if this may help to reduce the 'Hammer effect in a water line but I was told by a friend to cut into an existing line and put in a T with a piece of (200 mm+ long?) pipe that had one end capped or crimped (but must be water tight) as vertical as possible.
    The idea being as you fill the pipes with water, air gets trapped in the vertical piece and as air is compressible, this acts a shock absorber to stop the hammer effect.
    I do remember seeing a similar idea advertised but the pipe had a spring inside it and that was supposed to do the same thing.
    I have no idea where the best place to instal either, maybe try and find the general area of the pipe where the 'Hammer' happens and put this on the tap side of it.

    I did notice the other day that a hand basin with those 'Easy Hookers' had a very neat chromed purposely made 'Cut Off' between the pipe and the flexible connector.
    I stand unequivicably behind everything I say , I just dont ever remember saying it !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gordon_s1942 View Post
    I dont know if this may help to reduce the 'Hammer effect in a water line but I was told by a friend to cut into an existing line and put in a T with a piece of (200 mm+ long?) pipe that had one end capped or crimped (but must be water tight) as vertical as possible.
    The idea being as you fill the pipes with water, air gets trapped in the vertical piece and as air is compressible, this acts a shock absorber to stop the hammer effect.
    I do remember seeing a similar idea advertised but the pipe had a spring inside it and that was supposed to do the same thing.
    I have no idea where the best place to instal either, maybe try and find the general area of the pipe where the 'Hammer' happens and put this on the tap side of it.

    I did notice the other day that a hand basin with those 'Easy Hookers' had a very neat chromed purposely made 'Cut Off' between the pipe and the flexible connector.
    most cases of water hammer can be easily fixed unless you really have loose pipes
    all taps that are open full time (like washing machine/dishwasher(not talking about your missus now)/stopcocks to toilet cisterns/hot water systems) can bounce when a water supply gets suddenly turned on or off
    take to the stem of these tap washers with a pair of multi grips or nippers and deform the shaft so it sits nice and tight in your spindle
    some are brass and will need a couple of nice scores with a pair of nippers other are plastic/nylon and only need a pair of pliers
    don't go overboard and break the stem
    that should fix it most of the time
    problem is nowadays everyone has flick mixers and they can turn on/off very fast

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