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Thread: Does anyone know anything about windup watches?

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    Default Does anyone know anything about windup watches?

    I was thinking of purchasing a windup watch, it's an antique circa 1960.

    However I'm not sure about it. Are they hard to fix if they break? Are they more fragile than battery operated watches?

    Anybody here know?

    Last edited by Limmy; 08-07-12 at 08:11 PM.



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    Mechanical watches/clocks need maintenance, but if well designed every 10-20 years maybe.
    This involves stripping down, cleaning and lubrication, maybe $100-200 or more if extensive repair is needed.
    Most watches over 30 years old that were daily in use and not maintained properly would have issues.
    However if it was only occasionally used and kept very dry and dust free, it could be fine especially if it has mostly jewelled bushings. So look at the wear of engravings on the back.

    You should not purchase a pricey antique timepiece without a clockmaker first having a look at it.
    However I would not classify 1960's as antique, but some can be extremely pricey.

    You can have luck with a bargain if you get up very early and go to garage sales preferably from deceased estates.
    I even picked up a 1950's German anniversary clock for $5 in an Op-shop. I asked if it was the correct price and I was shaking like somebody about to get a heart attack when I left the store.
    Quick search on the internet revealed an average value of $550.

    It is not hard to find info in the net about what is worth collecting, which IMO is pretty much anything that is made in Switzerland and Germany, not West Germany, that is not antique but if it is only a few bucks, why not.

    I would not wear an old watch for daily use. Modern Japanese quartz movements are usually more reliable and who cares if they then break.
    This era of thoughtless consumption must end so we can encourage a world of creative geniuses rather than consumer idiots.


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    The more moving parts, the more complex and fragile.

    1960 isn't antique.

    There were some good watches around then, but also some junk too.

    A lot depends on the quality of the manufacture and maintenance since then.

    I would recommend an appraisal by a watchmaker before purchasing if possible, otherwise it may turn out a bargain, or an expensive piece of rubbish.

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    hi mateif you buy a cheap one it will probably loose time.
    i have a few hand me downs in the garage somewhere,but last time were working fine.
    alot of the good old one glow in the dark.
    you can pick up a good quality one from weekend sales or deceased estates.
    dreamax 600,strong 4663

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