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Thread: Seized Heavy Duty Actuator.

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    Default Seized Heavy Duty Actuator.

    Hi everybody,
    Just wondering if anybody bother's to clean up and overhaul an actuator that has seized up due to 'condensation damage.' I am just wondering how easy it is to get into the inner tube of the actuator?
    I have not seen anything much on the net or you-tube with regard to overhauling actuators - and if it is actually worth the head-ache.
    Even with grease, CRC and oiling the actuator - condensation still seems to get into the works.
    Thanks all.



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    It's not so much condensation as rain water running down the barrel of the actuator and entering the interior of the telescoping sections and sometimes also entering the motor.

    On some occasions, I have dismantled larger, heavy duty actuators and freed seized bearings in both the inner tube and also in the motor.

    There is usually a bolt (or bolts) locking the outer tube to the motor housing. Once removed, the two can be separated.

    Some actuators (e.g. Venture brand) have a shear coupling between the lead screw and drive motor gearbox, so don't damage or lose it.

    There is a lock nut fitted to the end of the lead screw, which can be removed to allow separation of the telescoping sections.

    Bearings (ball races fitted to the lead screw inside the tube) often suffer due to rust and must be replaced.

    Sometimes the motor armature becomes rusted causing the motor to seize. The motor rotor and stator can be cleaned, carbon brushes and brush holders cleaned, bearings cleaned, motor (rotor shaft) lubricated with light oil and then reassembled.

    The limit switch in the motor housing will require re-synchronising/adjustment so that it correctly indicates start and end of actuator travel. The method differs from one brand of actuator to another, but should become obvious when disassembling the actuator.

    Applying oil or grease to the inner, telescoping section of the barrel can cause problems due to the adhesion of airborne dirt mixing with the grease/oil, which causes unnecessary wear to the barrel. I prefer to leave that surface dry.

    If necessary, nylon gears inside the motor gearbox can be cleaned and re-lubricated with the correct nylon lubricant/grease.

    If damage due to corrosion is excessive, I wouldn't bother attempting to repair any of the cheap Chinese actuators.

    The more expensive heavy duty, better quality American-manufactured (24 inch and 36 inch) brands such as Venture, are worth doing though.
    Last edited by tristen; 21-12-15 at 11:37 PM.

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    Default

    There are also usually drain holes in the lower section.

    These need to be kept open for water/moisture to escape.

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    Lightbulb

    In my experience it is condensation what prematurely causes your run of the mill actuators to fail.

    Ever since I have drilled 2 holes in housing at lowest point & attached small diameter drain tubes actuators last for a much much longer period.

    This allows condensation to drain resulting in no or minimal corrosion.

    Aliashere
    Last edited by aliashere; 26-12-15 at 02:19 PM.

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    David071,

    Any progress to report regarding this problem?

    I'm curious and probably others are too.

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